Pastoral care

Pastoral Care is located on the first floor in the office next to  New Orleans East Hospital’s  (NOEH) Prayer Room. The Prayer Room is available 24/7 for personal meditation.   The clergy/chaplain is available to persons of all faiths.  Patients are able to use their own personal clergy but a Chaplain/Clergy can be contacted by request. (504)592-6797


What is Pastoral Care?

The Prayer Room is available 24/7 as a quiet place of prayer and meditation for all patients, families and staff. To request a chaplain, ask for the charge nurse or dial Ext. 6797 from anywhere in the hospital. In keeping with NOEH’s commitment to care for patients with courtesy, concern, kindness, and compassion, chaplains work to meet the non-medical needs of patients by offering spiritual and emotional support.  The Chaplain is a professional caregiver who understands that healing is spiritual, emotional and social, as well as physical.  The Pastoral Care Staff is also available to hospital personnel for either work-related or personal concerns.
When to Notify a Chaplain:

  • At times of approaching death or recent death of a loved one
  • In times of crisis (acute illness, trauma, or poor prognosis)
  • When you observe someone or feel yourself to be in need of pastoral care (stressful day, ongoing tearfulness, little family support, etc.)
  • When facing significant loss or change
  • In times of ethical dilemma and decision (DNR status, organ donation)
  • To prepare, officiate or participate in weddings, funerals, memorial services, baptism, bar/bat mitzvahs, and communion
  • To offer prayer for a specific need or occasion
  • To provide in-service education or facilitate support groups, focusing on spiritual and/or bereavement resources for healing, recovery and renewal
  • To honor the sacredness of daily life, especially the joys and challenges of healthcare providing and receiving
  • To request a blessing for another or yourself, for a new work, home, ministry, child or simply to remember we are beloved
The Chaplain’s listening skills are framed in a theological background, stressing the ministry of presence and acceptance. The Chaplain’s role, therefore, is not necessarily a problem-solving one, but rather one of helping patients to integrate what is happening to them in their illness with their understanding of their relationship to a higher power. 



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